National

ICYMI: Here are our top stories from Sunday, June 23

- Post Report, Kathmandu

Jun 23, 2019-

Here are some of the top stories from The Kathmandu Post (June 23, 2019).

With few options for education and employment, deaf community remains limited to service jobs and skilled work

For deaf people like Bogati, despite their skills, talents and interests, there are very few avenues of education and employment to pursue.

In many schools for the hearing-impaired, education ends at 10th grade. Higher education, when available, is very restrictive, further limiting their employment opportunities in vocational and skills-related work—carpentry, tailoring, electrician, plumbing—and service-related works.

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Shackling of Resham Chaudhary shows how the state treats its citizens differently, rights defenders say

After reports and images surfaced on social media and newspapers showing Resham Chaudhary lying on a hospital bed, one of his legs shackled, Prime Minister KP Sharma Oli on Saturday swiftly directed the chief secretary to remove the chain.

Oli, according to his press coordinator Chetan Adhikary, also ordered action against the official responsible for restraining him even during treatment at Bir Hospital.

Chaudhary was convicted on March 6 of masterminding the 2015 Kailali incident, in which nine people were killed during a violent scuffle between the Tharus and security personnel.

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How schools are becoming easy target to fulfil petty party interests

For years since the start of the Maoist insurgency, academic institutions became the first target of the dissenting party to pressurise the government to fulfil its interests. But after the Maoists joined peaceful politics in 2006 following the Comprehensive Peace Accord, other parties and their sister wings adopted the practice of shutting down schools and colleges to make their demands heard.

The tendency, however, waned after the second Constituency Assembly elections in 2013. And it almost stopped, with some exceptions, after the promulgation of the constitution in 2015.

But of late, the Netra Bikram Chand-led Communist Party of Nepal, an offshoot of the Maoist party that waged the decade-long insurgency, is increasingly resorting to the pressure tactics of calling educational strikes.

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From a humble start to a global breakthrough, Sompal Kami’s career gathers momentum

Sompal Kami grew up watching cricket in his locality in Punjab where his parents had migrated to in search of work. It was not unusual for him to dream about playing big games, especially in the wake of the glitzy Indian Premier League.

"But I wanted to play for the Nepali national team," said Kami who returned to Nepal in 2013 with whatever skills he had honed while he was in India.

Kami, who entered into the national team as a bowler, has established himself as the best all-rounder now.

On Thursday, Kami made a global breakthrough when Winnipeg Hawks bought him for $3,000 in a draft pick for the Global Twenty20 Canada.

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Blue Up High treads an already much-explored musical territory

Suraj Shahi Lama, who goes by his stage name Bluesss, shot to fame with Straight Outta Kathmandu, back in February. A collaborative single by him, Nepali rapper Uniq Poet and Danish rapper MC Dave, the song was an instant hit and has garnered more than a million views in just four months.

Three months later after the single, when Bluesss released his 15-track R&B/rap debut album, Blue Up High, it too was received well--gathering over 2.5 million views on his YouTube channel and over 4,800 monthly listeners on Spotify, a feat impressive for a newbie into the Nepali music industry.

That is probably because his music is familiar: like pop songs, with its ultra-simple and hyper-processed tunes, the tunes stick with you, and keep you hooked. The first track, ‘Intro’, as original as the name is, encapsulates what the album is all about, its funky beats giving listeners an introduction of what is to come.

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Published: 23-06-2019 19:22

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