Four years after Nepal’s deadly earthquakes, survivors continue to live in disarray

  • Many survivors of the 2015 earthquake say financing reconstruction of their homes and the burden of loans have become major challenges, pushing them further into poverty
TSERING NGODUP LAMA in SINDHUPALCHOK & ARPAN SHRESTHA in KATHMANDU, Apr 24 2019
POST PHOTO: TSERING NGODUP LAMA
One of the biggest complaints from villagers is that the reconstruction grant is inadequate to initiate reconstruction and the overall tranche is not enough to complete a house.
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Bhaktapur sets an example for local-led heritage reconstruction, while Kathmandu and Patan fall short

  • The three cities of the Valley have all adopted their own approaches to reconstructing their heritage. While Bhaktapur has stayed strictly local, Kathmandu and Patan have welcomed foreign funds and expertise, irking activists.
Timothy Aryal, Apr 24 2019
Post Photo: Elite Joshi
The three cities of the Valley have all adopted their own approaches to reconstructing their heritage. While Bhaktapur has stayed strictly local, Kathmandu and Patan have welcomed foreign funds and expertise, irking activists.
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Barpak— then and now

Prakash Chandra Timilsena, Kathmandu, Apr 25 2019
(Left) An aerial view of Barpak on May 21, 2015, after the devastating earthquakes; (Right) Barpak today.Post photo: Prakash Chandra Timilsena
When the 2015 earthquakes hit the village of Barpak, Aash Kumari Ghale was working in the fields with her son and daughter. She rushed home to find it in ruins, but ultimately, she was relieved she didn’t lose any family members, unlike thousands of other families.

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Cash-strapped Nepal Airlines struggles to stay afloat—and it is going deeper into debt

SANGAM PRASAIN, Kathmandu, Apr 24 2019
POST FILE PHOTO
The cash flow problem in the state-owned airlines, however, started nine months ago when it inducted two brand new Airbus A330 jets into its fleet last year, as they largely remained under-utilised for months after failing to get enough routes to fly.

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Commission paid to gas bottlers hiked to Rs 259.88 per cylinder

RAJESH KHANAL, Kathmandu, Apr 25 2019
Workers conduct a safety test at Rapti Gas Bottling plant in Dang.POST FILE PHOTO
Bowing to a long-standing demand from gas bottlers, Nepal Oil Corporation has raised their commission by Rs27.88 per cylinder. According to corporation officials, gas bottlers will receive a commission of Rs259.88 per cylinder from Thursday.

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Main News

Conflict victims’ associations to recommend names for transitional justice bodies

BINOD GHIMIRE, Apr 25 2019
The conflict victims’ organisations are making preparations to recommend the names of office-bearers for the two transitional justice bodies, with a belief that the government will amend the existing transitional justice act before the new leaderships have assumed the two offices.
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Five people dead, 34 injured in Dadeldhura bus accident

DR PANTA, Apr 25 2019
An overloaded bus plunged some 200 metres off the road at Sahukharka along the Bhimdutta Highway in Dadeldhura district on Wednesday, killing five persons and injuring 34 others.
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Smuggler held with 750 grams of gold hidden in his rectum

NAYAK PAUDEL, Apr 25 2019
The customs officials at the Tribhuvan International Airport on Wednesday arrested a Bangladeshi national with 750 grams of gold hidden in his rectum.
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Money

World

Flash floods and landslides triggered by torrential rain in Indonesia’s easternmost province of Papua have killed at least 58 people, injured dozens and displaced more than 4,000, authorities said on Sunday.

A search for more possible victims was under way in the town of Sentani, which was hit by flash floods late on Saturday. Fifty-one people were killed and 74 injured there, Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, spokesman of the national disaster agency, told a news briefing.

Heavy rain caused landslides in the nearby provincial capital of Jayapura, killing seven there, Nugroho said.

Soldiers pulled alive a 5-month old baby from under the rubble of his house and took him to hospital, Papua military spokesman Muhammad Aidi said.

The number of victims “will probably increase because the evacuation process is still taking place and not all affected areas have been reached,” Nugroho said.

About 4,150 people are sheltering in six evacuation centers, he said.

Hundreds of houses, three bridges and a Twin Otter airplane parked at the airport were damaged by the floods. The Sentani airport, the province’s main transport hub, remained open.

TV footage showed mud and large logs on Sentani’s main roads after floodwaters receded.

Disaster authorities have warned local governments of flash flood risks due to deforestation in the mountains surrounding the town, Nugroho said, adding that in 2018 Jakarta sent seedlings intended for tree-planting.

“Forest destruction in the Cyclops mountains have increased for use as firewood and to turn the land into plantations,” Nugroho said.

“Since 2018 we have warned the Jayapura government to be careful of flash flood risks because of this deforestation,” he added.

Arts and Entertainment

Life & Style

Fiction Park

Remembering a rebellious girl

Ujwol Shrestha, Apr 21 2019
 As I said this in a soft spoken voice, tears rolled down her rosy cheeks. With gentle affection I caressed her hair. She stopped crying. For almost twenty minutes, we just sat there in silence staring at  the cat. No words. Sometimes words are unnecessary if the feelings are genuine. And my feelings were genuine. For all her stubbornness and rebellious manners, I had a profound affection for Tibrata. I knew she was a lonely girl and was yearning for love and affection.
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Saturday Features

Internet cafés or ‘wangbas’ in China create a space for internet addicts

Tripty Tamang Pakhrin
Internet cafés in China have created a new space where people lose themselves within the virtual world of online gaming--a chance to explore an experimental world without any impediment.

'Nepalis come across a huge wall that divides one part of the world from another'

Avasna Pandey
The presence of Narendra Modi and Amit Shah at the helm has only made things worse. These people are bent on hardening borders, rather than dissolving them.

The beatmaker

ABANI MALLA
On a cold and rainy winter’s day, 19-year-old Sagun Khadka sits at a cafe in Jhamsikhel, listening to hip-hop on his headphones.

Shreesha Bhandari’s Athot deserves to be read by young people seeking guidance

MOHAN GURAGAIN
Without failing to shed light on the importance of time, Athot stresses that what we failed to do in our lives are not less important than what we actually did. 

Guffadi: Our Oli government is not a communist but a truly wild capitalist party

Guffadi
Once again, let us congratulate our Oli government for passing the Medical Mafia Bill. Now, Dr KC should go home and rest.

Celebrating a century

Prakash Chandra Timilsena
Calmly seated in a chariot pulled by her grandchildren, great grandchildren and great-great grandchildren, Mayju Maharjan observes her fifth janko—a rare ritual, called Mahadivya Ratharohan, where an elder is celebrated for completing 108 years, eight months, eight days, eight hours, and eight seconds around the sun. 

The paper trail

Prakash Chandra Timilsena
In 1995, 50-year-old Nima Sherpa moved from Dolakha to Kathmandu with a plan—he was going to take traditional Nepali lokta paper to the world. Sherpa had realised that products made of lokta, which were easily available in his village, could make it big in the international market.

Life and art are inextricably blended into each other

Timothy Aryal
Mekh Limbu’s art needs little elaboration. It speaks the truth, laid out for all to see and reflect on. It’s real; it’s quiet, keening and sharp. Take his installation ‘How I Forgot My Mother Tongue’, for instance, which was part of the Opposite Dreams exhibition displayed during the Photo Kathmandu festival last year.

Raamesh Koirala’s book about Charles Sobhraj is confused, leaving the reader unsure of whether this is a memoir or a novel

Pranaya SJB Rana
Raamesh Koirala’s new book about the notorious serial killer Charles Sobhraj is a strange animal. Although ostensibly presented as a non-fiction memoir written by the cardiac surgeon who operated on Sobhraj’s heart, the copyright page of the book asserts that “This is a work of fiction.” Perhaps this was an (glaring) oversight on the part of the publisher, but given the manner in which the book unfolds, it might be an accurate characterisation.